Coronavirus | Italy

No entry to restaurants without a "green passport"

In Italy, anyone who does not have a green passport and therefore does not show up for work may be exempted without pay - in public institutions after five days, in the private sector immediately.
IMAGO / Bihlmayerfotografie
In Italy, anyone who does not have a green passport and therefore does not show up for work may be exempted without pay - in public institutions after five days, in the private sector immediately.

Italy will be the first country in Europe to require all private and public sector workers to have vaccinations or negative Corona tests in order to perform their jobs. The government of Prime Minister Mario Draghi decided to extensively expand the "green passport". Those who cannot show a certificate will not be allowed to go to restaurants from October 15.

With this measure Draghi wants to change the minds of vaccination opponents and doubters. Draghi pushed through the new decree despite protests from the trade unions and sections of the right-wing parties. In the consultations with the head of government, the latter had unsuccessfully demanded that Covid tests as alternatives to vaccinations should remain free of charge. It should not be that one has to pay to go to work, they said. Draghi's cabinet, however, only decided on price caps: Adults may pay a maximum of 15 euros per test, children 8 euros.

Violations will be punished

Violations of the rules are to be severely punished: Those who do not have a green pass - which includes the EU Corona certificate - and therefore do not show up for work may be given time off without pay - in public institutions after five days, in the private sector immediately. In some sectors, such as schools, the green pass is already compulsory. Employers who fail to carry out checks face fines of up to 1500 euros.

The new decree will apply from 15 October to 31 December. Until the end of the year, Italy is still officially under a Corona state of emergency.
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