Gourmet gastronomy | Denmark

Avant-garde temple Noma on the way to becoming a food lab

To remain avant-garde, it must move forward anew: Mastermind and Noma creator René Redzepi is closing to reopen.
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To remain avant-garde, it must move forward anew: Mastermind and Noma creator René Redzepi is closing to reopen.

Copenhagen's world-famous Michelin-starred restaurant Noma wants to fundamentally reposition itself as a major laboratory for innovative food.

"To continue to be Noma, we need to change," chef René Redzepi and his team announced Monday. The 2024 winter season will therefore be the restaurant's last season in its current form, he said. In 2025, he said, it will be transformed into a large test kitchen as Noma 3.0, dedicated to food innovation and the development of new flavors. Serving guests will continue to be part of the Noma identity, he said, though it will no longer be defined by being a restaurant.

 

Planning for the top restaurant's major transformation has reportedly been underway for two years. Under the impressions of the first Corona wave in 2020, he decided to put the restaurant on a different economic footing in the long term in order to focus more on creativity and less on production, Redzepi told the Danish newspaper Berlingske. Accordingly, the change means that Noma will remain closed as a classic restaurant indefinitely starting in 2025, but may open in Copenhagen - or elsewhere on Earth - limited to one season per year.

Noma, which currently has three Michelin stars, has been named the world's best restaurant five times, most recently in 2021, and its name is made up of the first syllables of the Danish words "nordisk" (Nordic) and "mad" (food).

Guests and chefs at the Noma restaurant
Imago/agefotostock
Guests and chefs at the Noma restaurant

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